Author Archives: mtherrell

Ft Armstrong?

One of the cool projects that I have worked on since moving back to Alabama focuses on using tree rings to date the construction of  a group of historical log buildings. I was asked by the AL Office of Archaeological Research to attempt to determine the construction history of three log buildings that were once

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Got to go to Cuba as part of the University of Alabama Cuba Center. As you might imagine it was a very interesting trip. I was there to to check out the potential for doing tree-ring studies on the island. Unfortunately I did not get to make any collections but I did get to visit several

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Choctawhatchee River

Went down to Bruce, Florida with Civil Eng. colleague G. Tootle as well as a great group of Environmental Science and CE students to core bald cypress trees to support a reconstruction of Choctawhatchee River streamflow. We were updating an earlier collection by D. Stahle as well as collecting some fantastic subfossil samples some of which

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Wabash River

Made a quick trip up to eastern Illinois in December to sample bottomland oak at Sielbeck Forest and Beall Woods, both of which have some very nice old growth oak. Sielbeck is just north of Metropolis IL, in the former channel of the Ohio River (8K years ago) and Beall Woods is adjacent to the

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More White River

In addition to sampling live trees, we were able to find a few dead standing snags and downed logs to sample. Hopefully these will help us get farther back in time than the living trees. For more pics see

Lakeport Plantation

If you are into old plantation houses Lakeport Plantation in eastern Arkansas is one of the finest restored examples in that state. A few years ago Dave Stahle and I used tree-rings to date the construction of the main house. It was built almost entirely of bald cypress, and nearly every log was cut in

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Climate and the Mfecane

The mfecane is thought to be a massive upheaval and devastation of Nguni tribal chiefdoms in the second decade of the 19th century in what is now KwaZulu-Natal and the Eastern Cape of South Africa. We show that pervasive cycles of drought and cold periods in southern Africa are significantly amplified and extended by volcanic

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